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Tuesday, 10 August 2010

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Puah yiska

Hey Sara Rivka, yasher koach. Its such a beautiful experience to feel part of the tribe. K'siva v'k'sima tovah!!!!!

Rut Biton

Shalom, I am also an Orthodox convert, from the Chippewa tribe. My mother's family was very broken and ashamed of who they were, while my father's side seems to have been in denial of their Jewish heritage. Now I feel i've elevated their sparks, in myself and my daughter.

My two sisters identify much more strongly now with our Native American roots, and I have found they're now more interested in Judaism than ever before.

However, I grew up with so much shame around our cultural background, I am pushing myself to enjoy native music. Thank you for making it more easy to bridge.

Oddly, I've married a Moroccan- Jewish man and find the culture to be closer to my mother's side and somehow familiar.

Leah

On the uncanny connection between Native & Jewish philosophies, I just read this fascinating excerpt about the Yurok Indian New Year. Amazingly similar to our Rosh HaShana and the Jewish concept of tikkun olam.

"The New Year ritual reenacts the mythical beginning of the cosmos. Therefore, by the logic of the eternal return, each New Year is the beginning of the cosmos. Thus, time flows in a closed circle, always returning to the sacred time celebrated during the New Year: the cosmos's entire duration is limited to one year, which repeats itself indefinitely.

In many cultures, this belief appears to be consciously held and clearly stated. From the perspective of these societies, the world "must be periodically renewed or it may perish. The idea that the Cosmos is threatened with ruin if not annually re-created provides the inspiration for the chief festival of the California Karok, Hupa, and Yurok tribes. In the respective languages the ceremony is called 'repair' or 'fixing' of the world, and, in English, 'New Year'. Its purpose is to re-establish or strengthen the Earth for the following year or two years."[22]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eternal_return_(Eliade)

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